The Clairvoyant & Enlightened Times

Issue 22 – 14 June 2017 – rattuos (**I have added a bit at the bottom as have discovered more on Rolf)

I have been clearing out my many books etc for the last few weeks much to the delight of our local charity shops who are doing a roaring trade in my CD’s, DVD’s, clothes, knick knacks etc. It was a lifetime’s task to acquire all this stuff and out it goes in box after box. Dying makes you look at your clutter in a different way, an unnecessary problem for others after you have gone. Quite what my fellow Glaswegians will make of my books is another matter as most are on the subjects covered here. Anyway yesterday I rescued one book from the dreaded box and put it by my bed. I could have picked any of them in fact but this was one I never really read, certainly not right through. What I did read or skim told me what I wanted to know many years ago which was that I had come across the author already, indeed spent seven years studying intensively under him without being aware of his identity. That is a real ‘hidden master’ for you. My teacher could have pointed me to the book but never mentioned the man. I found the book quite by accident at a jumble sale.

I was going to transcribe some of it for you but have made life easier for myself by copying some comments on his books from the net. There is one below that is very interesting and it concerns a conversation Rolf is said to have had with General Marshall

(George Catlett Marshall, Jr. (December 31, 1880 – October 16, 1959) was an American statesman and soldier. He was Chief of Staff of the United States Army under presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, and served as Secretary of State and Secretary of Defense under Truman. He was hailed as the “organizer of victory” by Winston Churchill for his leadership of the Allied victory in World War II Wikipedia)

Rolf was a doctor and a very serious man so I cannot think he would have lied however the subject on which he is quoted is one where all kinds of fabrications exist. There is no wiki entry for Rolf, or not one I have found although he has been very influential. In his book he mentions that he took a few students to whom he taught his theory of mind power. If he is famous for anything it is for dissolving clouds but anyone can do this. You look at a cloud in the sky and wish it away. It is much more difficult when you have witnesses but so are many things.

In his book he writes a few pages on hypnotism and self hypnosis which has interested me although I had not read his take on this before last night. I have written here some months ago about the great Scottish surgeon who coined the word hypnosis:

James Braid (19 June 1795 – 25 March 1860) was a Scottish surgeon and “gentleman scientist“. He was a significant innovator in the treatment of club-foot and an important and influential pioneer of hypnotism and hypnotherapy. He is regarded by many as the first genuine “hypnotherapist” and the “Father of Modern Hypnotism”.

Wikipedia

He was a most remarkable man but Rolf mentions two others and I have included their wiki pages below. One like Braid was a Scottish surgeon who used hypnosis around the same time as Braid. He used it as an anaesthetic for countless operations in India. The other also used it and was another surgeon who was trained in Edinburgh. What happened about that time which brought the remarkable work on hypnosis and its healing potential to an end was that chloroform was developed and our modern anaesthetics took over. You may note how:

“Originally published in the US as Creative Realism. A New Method of Winning (1954), this volume is better known by its UK title, The Power of the Mind — The System of Creative Realism (1956) — not to be confused with The Healing Power of the Mind by the same author.
Benjamin Creme states that this volume “is very interesting in that it provides a very simple process of self-hypnosis whereby you can free the mind from its fragmentation in the subconscious” (The Art of Living, p.158-59).
In his book Self-Suggestion and the New Huna Theory of Mesmerism and Hypnosis (HuNa Research Publications, CA, USA, 1958, p.38) Max F. Long writes: “Dr. Alexander offers the theory that we are all hypnotized to a considerable degree by what has happened to or around us in our lives. He seems to blame many of our personality troubles on this form of hypnosis-without-a-hypnotist, and he offers a method which he calls ‘self-realization’ to be used to dehypnotize ourselves. The use of this method is urged as a preliminary to the administering of autosuggestion. It is also to be used as an antidote to remaining in a suggestible trance to some extent after the use of autohypnosis.”

In the Preface to his first book Benjamin Creme writes that “The magazine article which drew my attention to [The Power of the Mind], of course, concentrated on the most sensational aspect of the book — ‘cloud busting’, the breaking up of clouds by the power of thought alone” (The Reappearance of the Christ and the Masters of Wisdom, p.12). Given Mr Creme’s early interest in flying saucers, his reference is probably to an article by Dr Alexander in the November/December 1955 edition of the British Flying Saucer Review, titled ‘Psychokinesis’ (pp.8-10). Earlier that year, in the US, FATE magazine carried an article about Dr Alexander (‘Rolf Alexander — The Man Who Smashes Clouds’) in its issue No.63 of June 1955 (pp.42-45), with photographs from the local Orillia Packet and Times newspaper.
This book contains the same photographs of the famous cloud-dispersal demonstration that Dr Alexander gave at the town of Orillia, Ontario, Canada on 12 September 1954, in the presence of representatives of the media and the mayor of Orillia. In the original US edition and the first UK edition these photographs are printed on the back of the dust jacket, while an additional set of 12 photographs is included in the book showing a cloud-dispersal demonstration which the author gave at Mexico City in January 1952, “before reliable and qualified witnesses”, as well as an Appendix and a Bibliography, which are not included in later UK impressions, the fourth and last of which appeared in 1968. In the closing paragraph of the Appendix the author writes: “This present book is written as a training manual in the basic principles of Creative Realism, but other books are planned to carry on from where this one halts.” (Another cloud-busting technique is described in Wilhelm Reich (1957), Contact With Space.)

Rolf Alexander M.D., a 1.8 degrees initiate (Share International No.1, Jan./Feb. 1995, p.31), was born on the American Clipper ship Luzon en route to New Zealand in 1891. He was taken by his parents to Canada as a boy, graduated in medicine in Prague and studied as a personal pupil of the Greek-Russian philosopher Gurdjieff in 1913. Around 1938 Dr Alexander travelled to India and on to Tibet where he stayed for one year as “the guest of an English-speaking abbot of a lamasery near Shigatze,” according to the biographical information on the back flap of the original US and UK editions. In Chapter 12, in the paragraph ‘The Lama’, the writer describes one of the hands-on lessons in detachment from the physical body from this lama, whom Benjamin Creme has confirmed was the Master Djwhal Khul (see the notes for The Voice of Talking Valley).
No further biographical information about the author could be found, except for a reference in The UFO Encyclopedia (2nd ed. 1998, p.277) by Jerome Clark, who writes: “In 1956, England’s Flying Saucer Review published startling revelations by a contributor identified only as a ‘special correspondent.’ The correspondent asserted that a highly placed American official had confided to him that UFOs were known to contain friendly space visitors who were trying to find a way to breathe Earth’s atmosphere before landing and declaring themselves. The magazine revealed nine years later that its unnamed informant was one ‘Rolf Alexander, M.D.,’ and that the official was the late general and diplomat George C. Marshall [of Marshall Plan fame, Ed.].”
Clark continues: “It did not mention that ‘Alexander’ was in fact an ex-convict whose real name was Allan Alexander Stirling. ‘Alexander’ claimed vast psychokinetic powers that allowed him to break up clouds.” According to Benjamin Creme, however, Rolf Alexander “was not Alexander Stirling, nor was he convicted of any crime.” (Share International No.10, December 2007, p.27)
Interestingly, UFO researcher Timothy Good also mentions Dr Alexander in his book
Alien Base.

http://www.biblioteca-ga.info/50/toon/124

The Healing Power of the Mind

By Rolf Alexander, M.D.

$12.95

$10.36

Based on more than thirty years of research gleaned from Tibetan, Indian, and other cultures, this book provides both spiritual insight and practical advice concerning the true nature of healing, showing how imagination, desire, the power of suggestion, psychic influence, and the removal of limitations are valuable tools for maximizing our innate capacity for self-healing.

https://www.innertraditions.com/author/rolf-alexander-m-d/

A LOOK AT ROLF ALEXANDER

Okay! Orillia has certainly had its fair share of unique individuals who have added to our past being tense. But the one that stands out for me is one DR. ROLF ALEXANDER.

Haven’t heard of him? You can be forgiven. But then again, he may have lived under the radar completely, if it hadn’t of been for our very own Pete McGarvey. Pete was about as honest a fellow you would want to meet. As a radio personality in Orillia, he was a very trusted source. For now, we will give him the honour of giving Dr. Rolf Alexander his legitimacy.

Dr. Rolf Alexander came to Orillia via Prague, Tibet, Arizona, Africa, and the Caribbean. A medical doctor who was convinced there was more to medicine than a bottle of pills. Through years of research with monks, first nations people, witch doctors and sorcerers from around the world he came to the conclusion that the answer to all our problems lay in the subconscious. He wasn’t the first or the last to make a case for “its all in your head!”

Unfortunately, his claim to fame in our sunshine city did not result in an institute or even a spa that would gain world wide repute, such as the Weiss Institute in Miami. Otherwise, Orillia may have had a chance to be the focus of an Oprah Winfrey special if the stars had aligned properly. There is that fickle finger of fate playing its tricks again with our communal destiny.

No, instead his claim comes to us via a party trick called Cloud Busting. Yes, I know Pete McGarvey bought into it. My dad swore he once saw a UFO and spent good quality small talk convincing his friends that the mother ship was very nearby. Oh, just as a side note, Alexander was quite knowledgeable when it came to UFOs, as well. Nevertheless, sceptic though I be, I will give McGarvey the benefit of the doubt.

Dr. Alexander demonstrated, not only to Pete McGarvey, but also to a fine crowd of Orillians, from the Mayor to the reporters of Orillia Packet, that you just had to put your mind to it. In Couchiching Beach Park, in September 1954 the mantra was “Pick a cloud, any cloud! And to top it off, Alexander made mention that even the Russians were using powers of the mind. The communists were using power of the mind techniques? Oh my word! Then it must be real!

So as THE ORILLIA SPIRIT by Randy Richmond states ” Alexander invited the Mayor John McIsaac to pick a cloud. The Mayor being polite picked a small one. After a few minutes, the cloud disappeared…” But reporters being reporters cut to the chase and had him take on one cloud after another, recording the entire event. Well, I guess that says it all except that it seems that in order to do the event the conditions had to be ideal. When were talking clouds, cumulus is what were looking for. And if we’re talking cumulus I refer you to Cloud Busting Secrets, Make Clouds Vanish, Appear & More by Devin Knight & Jerome Finley. Good fun, if nothing else.

Outside of his book CREATIVE REALISM, Rolf Alexander’s cloud bashing prowess in Orillia brought him a lot of attention. In fact, he was so popular the federal immigration department got wind of the fact that his visa had expired. And a good thing they had, because who knows if he had been able to smash the cloud of mystery that surrounds Parliament Hill. So he and his family had to rough it in England and then in Florida, where he spent his final days. Too bad he could have spent his days shoveling with us.

Well, where does that leave Orillians? It leaves them with a good story. Another unique Orillian who made his mark. However, for Orillians,any fame or fortune was denied them. But that’s the way of Past Tense, a fine yarn that makes you say…darn!

http://www.orillian.ca/orillia-history/rolf-alexander/

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world’s literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

The Doctor Alone Can’t Cure You Hardcover – 13 Jun 2008

by Rolf Alexander M.D. (Author)

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Next we find this other bit – UFO’s and aliens and I cannot confirm any of this nor wish to. I would point out that hypnosis can affect huge swathes of populations, cause wars and riots and also brain washing. If our governments decided to keep this all quiet no one can blame them. These days there is practically no interest in the subject anyway and decades of ridicule have seen to that. I was surprised to see Rolf’s name even mentioned in this context.

 

A Need to Know: UFOs, the Military and Intelligence

https://books.google.co.uk/books?isbn=0330543490

Timothy Good – 2012 – ‎Social ScienceAs reported in Chapter 5, Dr Rolf Alexander discussed the subject with General Marshall at this time, and during the meeting the general confirmed that alien …

And various other articles on this like:

“Did you ever hear that story George Marshall told Dr. Rolf Alexander about a UFO crash in Mexico?

“The United States has recovered UFOs and their occupants. The UFOs were from a different planet and they were friendly. They have been hovering over defense facilities and airports. The U.S. authorities were convinced they had nothing to fear from them. The U.S. wanted people to concentrate on the real menace, communism, and not be distracted by the visitors from space. There has actually been contact with the men in the UFOs and there have been landings.”

General George C. Marshall

U.S. Army Chief of Staff in World War II; Secretary of State, 1947

(as told to Dr. Rolf Alexander)

1951″

http://www.aliens-everything-you-want-to-know.com/AliensEverybodyKnows.html

But was this really him? Smokescreens or not

No further biographical information about the author could be found, except for a reference in The UFO Encyclopedia (2nd ed. 1998, p.277) by Jerome Clark, who writes: “In 1956, England’s Flying Saucer Review published startling revelations by a contributor identified only as a ‘special correspondent.’ The correspondent asserted that a highly placed American official had confided to him that UFOs were known to contain friendly space visitors who were trying to find a way to breathe Earth’s atmosphere before landing and declaring themselves. The magazine revealed nine years later that its unnamed informant was one ‘Rolf Alexander, M.D.,’ and that the official was the late general and diplomat George C. Marshall. It did not mention that ‘Alexander’ was in fact an ex-convict whose real name was Allan Alexander Stirling. ‘Alexander’ claimed vast psychokinetic powers that allowed him to break up clouds.

According to Benjamin Creme, however, Rolf Alexander “was not Alexander Stirling, nor was he convicted of any crime.” (Share International No.10, December 2007, p.27)”

“I don’t know about you, but the authenticity of this particular Marshall “quote” is highly suspect in my opinion. Why on earth would he share such information with some random doctor in an airport anyway? Not to mention a doctor who appears… well… Eccentric?”

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/topic/203814-merged-fbi-roswell-memo-released/?page=8

Etc etc

Benjamin Crème was also fairly eccentric – another Scot who died last October.

 

Here are the two surgeons mentioned above – Esdaile and Elliotson beginning with a letter to James Braid the Scottish surgeon who coined the term hypnotism:

 

James Esdaile to James Braid (October 1850).

I shall find much in the books to interest and instruct me, as I did in your firstwork on Hypnotism; but I shall not wait to read them before replying to your communication.

I have not seen any of the papers you allude to in the journals; but am glad to hear that the doctors are, at last, condescending to turn their attention to one of the most interesting and important subjects ever submitted to the consideration of the physiologist, the metaphysician, and natural philosopher.***

Regarding the reality and cause of the mesmeric phenomena, if I venture to differ from you even, who are so much better prepared to investigate the subject [than certain individuals to whom the Doctor had referred], it is for reasons which I hope you will consider worthy your attention. I am fully aware that there are various modes of inducing the mesmeric symptoms, to a certain extent, without the probability, or even possibility, of any vital force proceeding from the operator being concerned in the matter. But I have never (except for experiment) produced the mesmeric state of the system by the exhaustion of any organ, such as the eye, [here the Doctor has overlooked the important part which the mental act of fixed attention plays in this matter] or by acting strongly on the imagination, or by any means that could favour self-mesmerization, as you will perceive from the following resumé of my practice:—

During the last six years I have performed upwards of 300 capital operations of every description, and many of them of the most terrible nature, without in-flicting pain on the patients; and, in every instance, the insensibility was produced in this fashion.

All knowledge of our intentions was, if possible, concealed from the patients; and if they had never heard of mesmerism and painless operations, so much the better. They were taken into a darkened room, and desired to lie down and shut their eyes. A young Hindoo or Mussulman then seated himself at the head of the bed, and made passes, without contact, from the head to the epigastrium, breathing on the head and eyes all the time, and occasionally resting his hands for a minute on the pit of the stomach. This often induced the coma deep enough for the severest surgical operation in a few minutes; but the routine was for me to examine the patient at the end of an hour, and if he was not ready, the process was repeated daily. Taking the average, the operation, of whatever description, was usually performed on the fourth or fifth day.

Probably as many more cases were subjected to the trance for medical purposes, and were usually treated in the same way, for its convenience to both parties. The enclosed remarkable case of clairvoyance, with transference of the senses to the epigastrium, will show that the mesmeric control of the system may be obtained, when the patient is not only asleep, but in a state of intense natural coma.

I have also entranced a blind man, and made him so sensitive, that I could entrance him however employed, (eating his dinner, for instance) by merely making him the object of my attention for ten minutes. He would gradually cease to eat, remain stationary a few moments, and then plunge, head fore-most, among his rice and curry.

Numbers of madmen have been entranced in the lunatic asylum of Calcutta; and I performed a mesmeric operation on one man who had cut his throat. I frequently desired the visitors of my hospitals to pretend to take the portraits of patients, and to engage their attention as much as possible, by conversing with them. I then retired to another room, and reduced them to statues, without the possibility of their suspecting my intentions.

How such phenomena can be accounted for, without presuming the existence of a physical power transmitted from the operator to the subject, passes my comprehension. That the mesmeric virtue can be communicated to inanimate matter, is a physical fact, of which I am as well convinced as of my own existence. It was my common hospital practice to entrance patients for the purpose of having their sores burned with Nitric Acid, by giving them mesmerised water to drink.

Community of taste, and thought-reading, are among the most common of the higher mesmeric phenomena; and how they are to be explained, except by the transmission of the operator’s sensations, through his thought-stamped, nervous fluid, sent to the brain of the subject, I cannot conjecture. “Important, if true”, you will probably say. I can only say, that healthy senses, a natural power of seeing things as they really are, and an earnest desire to know the truth, whatever it may be, are perfectly useless for the acquisition of knowledge, if all I have related is not perfectly true.

Till such facts are known to medical men and natural philosophers, it is surely premature to dogmatise about the only source of the mesmeric phenomena. It happened, curiously enough, that the sleeping Faqueer of Lahore had attracted my attention about the very time your interesting account of him appeared, and I had actually written to Sir Henry Lawrence, begging him to procure us information on the subject; but my departure from India, shortly after, prevented my prosecution of the subject.”

James Esdaile, M.D., E.I.C.S, Bengal (1808–1859), a Scottish surgeon, who served for twenty years with the East India Company, is a notable figure in the history of mesmerism.

The eldest son of the Rev. James Esdaile, D.D. (1775–1854), a minister of the Church of Scotland, and Margaret Blair (1781–1843), he was born in Montrose, Angus, Scotland on 6 February 1808. He died in Sydenham, Kent on 10 January 1859.

He had three brothers, David Esdaile, D.D. (1811-1880) — an ordained cleric, who, along with James Esdaile (his brother), founded Edinburgh’s Ministers’ Daughters’ College (later known as Esdaile School), dedicated to the education of the daughters of Ministers of the Church of Scotland, and of Professors in the Universities of Scotland — John Esdaile (1813-1877) and Robert Esdaile (1816-1882), both of whom migrated to Canada, and one sister, Janet (1818-1819).

He married three times.

His first wife, Mary Ann Christie, whom he had married on 6 June 1838, whilst on furlough in Scotland, died on 9 November 1838, “in her 18th year”, on their voyage to India (they left England on 24 July 1838).

His second wife, Sophia Ullmann — daughter of the Delaware banker, John James Ullmann (1754-1811) and Jeanne F. Ullmann (née LeFranc), and the sister of lawyer and, later, (Union) General Daniel Ullmann (1810-1892) — whom he married on 17 November 1842 at Chinsurah, while stationed at Hooghly, died in Calcutta on 27 July 1850, aged 44.

He married his third wife, Eliza Morton (1807-1862) (née Weatherhead) in Calcutta on 3 February 1851.

He studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, graduating M.D. in 1829.

In 1830, he was appointed as Civil Assistant Surgeon to the East India Company, and arrived in Calcutta, Bengal (which was, then, the capital of British India), in 1831.

Having suffered from chronic bronchitis and asthma since his adolescence, Esdaile thought that India’s different climate would be of benefit. Five years later, he suffered a total breakdown while working at Azamgarh, in Uttar Pradesh, and, later, was given an extended furlough from 1836 to 1838. During this time he travelled extensively; and his 1839 work, Letters from the Red Sea, Egypt, and the Continent, was written as a result of these travels.

He returned from his furlough to Calcutta, and was soon appointed as Civil Surgeon to the small Hooghli Imambara Hospital; and, through this appointment, he was also responsible for the hospital at Hooghly Jail.

From November 1839 to December 1841 Esdaile also served as the Principal of the prestigious Hooghly College, located in the palladian mansion in Chinsurah that had been originally designed and built for “General Perron”. The College had been founded in August 1836 by the Bengali philanthropist Haji Muhammad Mohsin, and Esdaile replaced the College’s original principal — another surgeon, Thomas Alexander Wise, M.D. (1802-1889) — who had been promoted to the position of Principal at the Dacca College.

He was serving as the Registrar of Deeds for Hooghly in 1843, and as Secretary of the Hooghly Branch of the Agricultural and Horticultural Society of India in 1843. He was promoted to Presidency Surgeon in January 1848, and was further promoted to Marine Surgeon (serving the Indian Navy) on 29 May 1849.

On 4 April 1845, Esdaile performed his first mesmeric procedure:

On 4 April 1845, [Esdaile] was treating a convict afflicted with double hydrocele. The drainage and injection of one side of the scrotum caused the patient such pain that Esdaile determined to try mesmerism upon him for the second operation…he was successful in rendering the convict analgesic, and at once began to experiment with mesmerism both as a means of producing analgesia in surgical cases, and as a method of treatment for medical ones.

By his own admission, Esdaile had never seen a mesmeric act; but, given the level of pain of this specific patient, and the understanding that he had gained from what he had read, it occurred to him that mesmerism might be of great value:

Seeing him [the patient] suffering in this way, I turned to the native sub-assistant surgeon, an élève [student] of the medical college, and asked him if he had ever seen Mesmerism? He said, that he had seen it tried at the medical college, but without effect. Upon which I remarked, “I have a great mind to try it on this man, but as I never saw it practised, and know it only from reading, I shall probably not succeed.”

Esdaile did succeed.

As performed by Esdaile, the mesmeric act was an exhausting procedure:

Esdaile’s method was to make the patient lie down in dark room, wearing only a loin cloth, and [Esdaile would] repeatedly pass the hands in the shape of claws, slowly over the [patient’s] body, within one inch of the surface, from the back of the head to the pit of the stomach, breathing gently on the head and eyes all the time [and] he seems to have sat behind the patient, leaning over him almost head to head and to have laid his right hand for extended periods on the pit of the stomach.

As a consequence, Esdaile, whose own health was far from good, soon began to delegate this exhausting work which, when necessary, would involve “[having] a patient magnetized for hours each day for ten or twelve days [to his] native assistants, saving his own strength for the performance of surgery”.

In a short time, Esdaile had gained a wide reputation amongst the European and indigenous communities for painless surgery, especially in cases of the scrotal “tumours” that were endemic in Bengal at that time due to filariasis (similar to elephantiasis) that was transmitted by mosquitoes. Esdaile’s mesmeric anaesthesia was extremely safe:

I beg, to state, for the satisfaction of those who have not yet a practical knowledge of the subject, that I have seen no bad consequences whatever arise from persons being operated on when in the mesmeric trance.

Cases have occurred in which no pain has been felt subsequent to the operation even; the wounds healing in a few days by the first intention; and in the rest, I have seen no indications of any injury being done to the constitution.

On the contrary, it appears to me to have been saved, and that less constitutional disturbance has followed than under ordinary circumstances.

There has not been a death among the cases operated on.

However, despite the successes with anaesthesia and his impressive surgical outcomes (exclusively with “native” patients), Esdaile was at a loss to explain these events in the light of his earlier (pre-mesmeric) six years’ experience:

Since [my first use of mesmerism in April 1845,] I have had every month more operations of this kind than take place in the native hospital in Calcutta in a year, and more than I had for the six years previous.

There must be some reason for this, and I only see two ways of accounting for it: my patients, on returning home, either say to their friends similarly afflicted, “Wah! brother, what a soft man the doctor Sahib is! He cut me to pieces for twenty minutes, and I made him believe that I did not feel it. Isn’t it a capital joke? Do go and play him the same trick ; you have only to laugh in your elbow, and you will not feel the pain.”

Or they say to their brother sufferers, — ” Look at me ; I have got rid of my burthen, (of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, or 80 lbs., as it may be,) am restored to the use of my body, and can again work for my bread: this, I assure you, the doctor Sahib did when I was asleep, and I knew nothing about it;—you will be equally lucky, I dare say; and I advise you to go and try; you need not be cut if you feel it.”

Which of these hypotheses best explains the fact my readers will decide for themselves.

It ought to be added, that most of these persons were not paupers, but people in comfortable circumstances, whom no inducement short of painless operations could tempt to enter a charity, or any other hospital; and all who know the natives are aware of this.[40]

In 1846, Esdaile’s work with mesmerism-assisted painless surgery at Hoogly had come to the attention of the Deputy Governor of Bengal, Sir Herbert Maddocks. Maddocks appointed a committee of seven reputable (medical and non-medical) officials to investigate Esdaile’s claims. They submitted a positive report (on 9 October 1846), and a small hospital in Calcutta was put at his disposal in November 1846.

By 1848, a mesmeric hospital supported entirely by public subscription was opened in Calcutta especially for Esdaile’s work. It was closed 18 months later by the Deputy Governor of Bengal, Sir John Littler: according to Cotton (1931, p.170), although the Mott’s Lane Mesmeric Hospital, opened in 1846, was permanently closed in 1848, Elliotson “continued to practise mesmerism at the Sukeas’ Street Dispensary until he left India in 1851”.

In 1848, Lord Dalhousie, the Governor-General of India, appointed Esdaile to the position of Presidency Surgeon; and, in 1849, whilst not supporting the continuation of the mesmeric hospital in Calcutta, Dalhousie had so much respect for Esdaile and his work, that he appointed him to the position of Marine Surgeon.

Esdaile retired from the British East India Company in 1853, upon the expiration of his 20 years’ contract. He became a Vic-President of the London Mesmeric Infirmary, and a Vice-President of the Scottish Curative Mesmeric Association . After briefly returning to Perth in Scotland he settled in Sydenham where he died on 10 January 1859. He is buried at West Norwood Cemetery.

Esdaile is thought by many to have been a pioneer in the use of hypnosis for surgical anaesthesia in the era immediately prior to James Young Simpson’s discovery of chloroform. However, Esdaile had studied neither hypnotism nor Mesmerism himself.

Although some would trace the practice of hypnotherapy back to Faria, Gassner, and Hell, it is conventional to trace what we now know as hypnotism back to the Scottish surgeon James Braid’s reaction to a public exhibition of mesmeric techniques given by Charles Lafontaine in Manchester on 13 November 1841

There are some similarities between both the theory and practice of Victorian Mesmerism and hypnotism. Braid viewed the Bengal Government’s report (i.e., Atkinson & O’Shaughnessy (1846)), on Esdaile’s use of Mesmerism in an Indian hospital favourably, although only 30% of Esdaile’s clients were entirely pain-free during their operations. Yet, Braid also expressed reservations about Esdaile’s claims of supernatural powers possessed by certain subjects, and noted that Esdaile’s operations were yet to be demonstrated in British hospitals on British patients.

 

In theory I entirely differ from Dr. Esdaile. He is a Mesmerist – that is, he believes in the transmission of some peculiar occult influence from the operator to the patient, as the cause of the subsequent phenomena.

In fact, as this report shows, Esdaile did not generally “Mesmerise” the patients himself but employed native Indian boys to spend 2–8 hours per day with each patient in a darkened room, employing a technique that involved breathing on the patient’s body. The resemblance to the conventional techniques of Mesmerism is therefore minimal.

Esdaile was a keen salmon fisherman, and it was “at [his] instigation that the proprietors of salmon-fishings on the Tay constructed the artificial breeding beds at Stormontfield” (Esdaile, 1857), when a letter, written by Esdaile, on the artificial propagation of salmon, “A Plan for Replenishing the River Tay with Salmon”, was submitted to a meeting of the proprietors on the Tay on 19 July 1852.

Wikipedia

John Elliotson (29 October 1791 – 29 July 1868), M.D. (Edinburgh, 1810), M.D.(Oxford, 1821), F.R.C.P.(London, 1822), F.R.S. (1829), professor of the principles and practice of medicine at University College London (1832), and senior physician to University College Hospital (1834).

He was a prolific and influential author, a respected teacher, always at the ‘leading edge’ of his profession (one of the first to use and promote the stethoscope, and one of the first in Britain to use acupuncture),[3] renowned for both his diagnostic skills as a clinician and his extremely strong prescriptions: “his students said that one should let him diagnose but not treat the patient”.

In concert with William Collins Engledue M.D., Elliotson was the co-editor of The Zoist: A Journal of Cerebral Physiology & Mesmerism, and Their Applications to Human Welfare, an influential British journal, devoted to the promotion of the theories and practices (and the collection and dissemination of reports of the applications) of mesmerism and phrenology, and the enterprise of “connecting and harmonizing practical science with little understood laws governing the mental structure of man”, that was published quarterly, without a break, for fifteen years: from March 1843 until January 1856.

The son of the prosperous London chemist and apothecary John Elliotson and Elizabeth Elliotson, he was born in Southwark on 29 October 1791.

He was a private pupil of the rector of St Saviours, Southwark, and went on to study medicine at the University of Edinburgh, from 1805 to 1810 — where he was influenced by Thomas Brown, M.D. (1778–1820) — and then at Jesus College, Cambridge, from 1810 to 1821), from both of which institutions he took the degree of M.D., and subsequently in London at St Thomas’ and Guy’s hospitals. In 1831 he was elected professor of the principles and practice of physic in London University (now University College London), and in 1834 he became physician to University College Hospital.

Barely 5 ft (152 cm) tall, with dark complexion and a very large head, he was also lame (following an 1828 carriage accident).

His appearance presented a strong contrast to his ‘intramural enemy’ Robert Liston (1794-1847), F.R.C.S. (Edinburgh, 1818), F.R.S. (1841), the University College’s Professor of Clinical Surgery, one of the fastest surgeons of all time (on one occasion Liston amputated a leg, mid-thigh, in 25 seconds), who was pale skinned, and at least 6 ft 2in (188 cm) tall. Liston was fiercely opposed to Elliotson’s ‘contamination’ of the hospital with his demonstrations of ‘higher states’ of mesmerism (i.e., rather than its ‘medical’ applications).

Despite his unusual physical characteristics, Elliotson was greatly admired as a lecturer, both for the structured clarity of his lectures, and the theatrical liveliness of their delivery. Once he began lecturing at the University College, his widely respected lectures were extensively reported in the medical press; and he published a number of collections of his lectures over the years. At his peak, he was the first President of the Royal Medical and Chirurgical Society (in 1833), a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and the Royal Society, he had one of the largest private practices in London and, at his peak, was one of the pre-eminent physicians in the entire British Empire.

He became interested in phrenology, and was founder and first President of the London Phrenological Society (in 1823). His interest in mesmerism had been aroused initially by the demonstrations conducted by Richard Chenevix in 1829, and re-awakened by Dupotet de Sennevoy’s demonstrations in 1837.

This prompted Elliotson to begin experimenting with the Okey sisters, Elizabeth (17) and Jane (15), who had been admitted to his hospital, in April 1837, for treatment of their epilepsy. Their surname was often given as O’Key and it was and is widely assumed they were Irish but in fact they came from an old English family (Okey comes from the oak tree). Elliotson soon began using them as subjects — in 1837 he inserted “a large seton needle with a skein of silk into it”, entirely painlessly, and without her even being aware that such a penetration had taken place, into the neck of Elizabeth Okey (the older sister) whilst she was mesmerized — within the confines of the hospital, in public demonstrations of the so-called ‘higher states’ of mesmerism: clairvoyance, transposition of the senses (seeing with the fingers, etc.), thought transmission, physical rapport or “community of sensation”, psychical rapport, etc. Convinced that the elder sister, Elizabeth, had a talent for medical clairvoyance (able to see into the body, diagnose illness, prescribe treatment, and deliver a prognosis), Elliotson took her down into the wards in the dead of night and had her both diagnose and prescribe treatments.

In August 1838, Thomas Wakley conducted a series of experiments on the sisters in front of several witnesses. His tests focussed on whether the girls could tell ‘mesmerised’ from ‘unmesmerised’ water. When they failed to do this consistently, he denounced them as frauds and proclaimed mesmerism a complete fallacy. In fact, the experiments did not prove the girls were faking nor did they show that mesmerism was false. By the end of 1838, however, Elliotson was forced to resign from the hospital. The Council of the University College, after months of deliberation, passed a resolution on 27 December 1838, “That the Hospital Committee be instructed to take such steps as they shall deem most advisable, to prevent the practice of Mesmerism or Animal Magnetism within the Hospital”; and Elliotson, on reading the contents of the resolution, resigned all of his appointments forthwith.

Wakley did all that he could, as editor of The Lancet, and as an individual, to oppose Elliotson, and to place all of his endeavours and enterprises in the worst possible light; for example, in addition to an extensive range of articles in The Lancet, over a number of years, there is also an anti-Elliotson (pseudonymous) work attributed to Wakley, Undeniable facts concerning the strange practices of Dr. Elliotson, … with his female patients; and his medical experiments upon the bodies of … E. & J. Okey, etc. (1842) which is held by the British Library, and another, most likely written by either Wakley or one of his associates, held in the collection of the Wellcome Library (see right).

In 1846 — by this stage bereft of all his institutional affiliations — and despite many earnest efforts made to prevent him doing so, as the Royal College of Physicians’ youngest fellow, Elliotson delivered the Harveian Oration to the Royal College of Physicians of London, in which he controversially spoke of how William Harvey, the man whom the Oration was honouring, had been forced to fight against the entrenched conservatism of the medical profession and its initial incredulity and resistance to his discoveries, and stressed the strength of the analogy with the current (equally misguided and ignorant) critics of mesmerism.

 

“In 1846, Elliotson’s turn came to deliver the Harveian Oration, but, as soon as it was known that he had accepted the office, he was attacked in the most savage manner, in order to prevent his appearing. For example, the Lancet called him a professional pariah, stated that his oration would strike a vital blow at legitimate medicine, and would be a black infamy degrading the arms of the College.

Undeterred by this, Elliotson made mesmerism the subject of his address. Without referring to the attacks which had been made upon him, he simply stated the result of his researches, and respectfully invited the College to examine alleged facts of overwhelming interest and importance.

He exhorted his hearers to study mesmerism calmly and dispassionately, and reminded them, with more truth than tact, that all the greatest discoveries in medical science, and the most important improvements in its practice, had been opposed by the profession in the most violent and unprincipled manner. As examples of scientific discoveries which had been received in this way, he cited those of the lacteal vessels, the thoracic duct, the sexual system of plants, the circulation of the blood, the sounds of the chest and their relation to the diseases of the heart and lungs and their coverings, etc. As instances of improvement in practice which had been treated in like manner, he referred to the employment of Peruvian bark, inoculation and vaccination for small-pox, the use of mild dressings, instead of boiling oil, in gun-shot wounds, the ligature of the bleeding vessels after operation, instead of the application of burning pitch or red-hot irons, etc.

We should, Elliotson said, never forget these things, nor allow authority, conceit, habit, or the fear of ridicule to make us hostile to truth. We should always have before our eyes that memorable passage in Harvey’s works: “True philosophers, compelled by the love of truth and wisdom, never fancy themselves so wise and full of sense as not to yield to truth from any source and at all times: nor are they so narrow-minded as to believe any art or science has been handed down in such a state of perfection to us by our predecessors that nothing remains for future industry.”

All this, Elliotson said, should be borne in mind when considering the alleged facts of mesmerism. In his opinion many of these were indisputable; for ten years he had shown how mesmerism could prevent pain during surgical operation, produce sleep and ease in sickness, and even cure many diseases which had been unrelieved by ordinary methods. It was the imperative and solemn duty of the profession to carefully and dispassionately examine the subject.

He therefore earnestly implored them to do so, if they cared for truth, their own dignity, and the good of mankind.” — John Milne Bramwell (1903)

Elliotson continued to provide mesmeric demonstrations from his own residence at 37 Conduit Street, Hanover Square (which he eventually quit in 1865). In partnership with Engledue, he began publishing The Zoist in 1843, and, in 1849 founded the London Mesmeric Infirmary. As his reputation rapidly declined, his once lucrative practice also disappeared, and he died, penniless, in 1868 in the London home of a medical colleague, Edmond Sheppard Symes (1805-1881), L.S.A. (1830), M.R.C.S (England, 1832), M.D. (Aberdeen, 1851).

 

“Elliotson firmly believed that mesmerism and phreno-mesmerism could be explained fully in physical terms [and, of] all Elliotson’s achievements, The Zoist is probably the most useful, mainly because it provides a detailed record of a crucial thirteen year period in the development of Victorian psychology.

Elliotson was a relentless advocate for his “truth.” His articulateness as a writer and his energy as an editor almost triumph over the limitations of his vision and the demands of advocacy … The wonder is that in the face of so much criticism Elliotson was able to maintain as much objectivity and professional rigor as he did, though clearly the pages of The Zoist need to be filtered carefully to distinguish what is of value from what is sheer advocacy and contentiousness …

Elliotson made three important contributions to the history of psychology and medicine.

By stressing the physical basis of mesmeric phenomena and its underlying causes in so far as they had therapeutic potential, he demonstrated that mesmerism could be used effectively in illnesses associated with the nervous system and as an anaesthesia in surgical procedures. Elliotson’s approach to the mind was through the body …

In addition, Elliotson was the first to attempt to detach the operations of mesmerism and the conditions of the procedure from conscious acts of will on the part of the subject and the operator, the patient and the doctor … In his appreciation of the non-rational and non-conscious elements within the procedure, [he] gave some direction and encouragement to those forces … that were laying the groundwork for Freud and other exponents of the relationship between the unconscious and psychiatric therapy.

Finally, Elliotson’s imposing mid-century presence and his widely reported mesmeric activities provided both the degree of legitimacy and the intellectual stimulation that encouraged James Braid, a Manchester surgeon, to develop his theories on the role of suggestion and auto-suggestion in mesmerism.” — Fred Kaplan (1982)

He was highly regarded in literary circles. WM Thackeray’s Pendennis was dedicated to his friend, Elliotson; and the character, Dr Goodenough (in Thackeray’s last novel, The Adventures of Philip (1862), was based on Elliotson, who had attended Thackeray when suffered a life-threatening illness in 1849.

Elliotson was a friend of Charles Dickens, and introduced Dickens to Mesmerisn. Wilkie Collins, a close friend of Dickens described Elliotson as “one of the greatest English physiologists,” and cites an example of state-dependent memory from Elliotson’s Human Physiology in The Moonstone.

Wikipedia

 

Of course the mere thought or mention of ‘clairvoyance’ was enough to send the medical world into uproar and it would be no different now. Careers ruined, men and women utterly discredited.

**

I have now found a bit more on the elusive Rolf Alexander. This next book is not by the real Rolf but someone who uses that as his pen name:

Atlas children

Rolf Alexander

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Around 1600-1500 BC, so we assure the experts, the mainland of what is now called Greece was only inhabited by a simple peasant population.

The first megalite monuments, so-called shaft graves, very similar to older from northwestern Europe, appeared only from around 1500 BC in Greece. This was after a natural disaster had taken place, which seems to have made an end to the stunningly beautiful Minoan civilization of Crete and islands in the neighborhood.

Then unexpectedly new people arrived we called Myceners later. They possessed superior weapons and chariots, knowledge in many areas and refined megalithic culture. Of course, the Myceners did not fall out of the sky, nor did they emerge from a still-discovered civilization somewhere in Central Asia. Wherever they came from and who they were, you can read in the book you are looking for. The true origin of the “Greeks” will prove even more amazing than you ever expected

 

Publisher RAMOSE BVThis book can be ordered at http://www.bol.com and at all bookstores in the Netherlands and Belgium under the number:ISBN: 9789402146967Rolf Alexander is a pseudonym of author Leo Heynen.Cover: Own photos of Stonehenge, the Apollo Temple in the Ilias of Homer.Cover design: Chris Summer

But here are 6 books by the real Rolf with notes that tell us a bit more although some are repeated above. His meeting with the man in Arizona and the ‘old Scottish doctor’ are not. I suspect these are not living people but his spirit guides. The Scottish doctor might be Esdaile or Braid and the man in Arizona someone like Gurdjieff. Did he invent the lama? Gurdjieff who he claims to have known invented his!

 

 

6 Titles on this shelf

Rolf Alexander M.D.

Your Unknown Doctor

This book was published as a handbook for the author’s patients and is the ‘ur-text’ for the book by Rolf Alexander that is still in print as The Healing Power of the Mind. The original title refers to an interview the author had with “an old Scottish doctor” who first told him of the human body as its own “Unknown Doctor” (p.3).
According to information on the dust jacket of a later book, the author studied with one of the Masters at a lamasery in Tibet in 1938. Little wonder, then, that the topics which Dr Alexander covers in his first book read like an introduction to the Ageless Wisdom teaching about the constitution of man and his world, but from a medical or self-healing point of view.
In this first edition, the bulk of which formed the basis for the 1943 US volume
The Doctor Alone Can’t Cure You, the author states in his Foreword that “The chapter headings are my own interpretations and condensations from one of the oldest books in the world: the Tibetian ‘Book of Right Feeling’.”

Dr Alexander later elaborated on the healing power of the mind in his book The Mind in Healing (Dutton, NY, 1958).

1939

Rolf Alexander M.D.

The Doctor Alone Can’t Cure You

This is the “revised” and “completely re-written” US edition of Dr Alexander’s first book, published in Canada in 1939 as Your Unknown Doctor and in the US under its present title in 1943 (reprinted in 1944). However, the first US edition was already somewhat revised from the original Canadian edition.
The author’s statement about the introductory headings to the chapters being his own interpretation from the Tibetan Book of Right Feeling is not included in the foreword to this edition, but Benjamin Creme has confirmed that the author translated these quotations from one of the books he studied in Tibet (see Share International No.10, December 2007, p.27). Also missing in the rewritten foreword is the reference to the “old Scottish doctor” who identifies the body as “your unknown doctor” in the title of the original 1939 edition.
In the rewritten Chapter 1, ‘The Quest’, however, the author describes how “he journeyed to India … and spent a year in a Tibetian lamasery at Podang, where he found for the first time an organized system of research into the powers and potentialities of the human Soul, and a regularized system of teaching the results of the research.” (p.14) This statement was not included in the original edition.

This revised edition also includes some exercises that formed the basis for the author’s third book, Creative Realism (US, 1954), aka The Power of the Mind (UK, 1956).
The first US edition was re-published in paperback as The Renewing Power of Your Mind (Warner Destiny Book, 1976), and later as
The Healing Power of Your Mind. The Doctor Alone Can’t Cure You (Healing Arts Press, 1989), and The Healing Power of The Mind. Practical Techniques for Health and Empowerment (Healing Arts Press, 1997).

The cover shown below is that of the first US edition, which was reprinted in 1944.

1943

Rolf Alexander M.D.

The Voice of Talking Valley

In this book, which according to the text on the back flap is largely “biographical,” Rolf Alexander sets out to research the “ultimate spiritual causes which are making [atomic] weapons [which Congress voted to spend billions on] necessary and their use inevitable.” In Part One he “thrusts his mental scalpel into the body of civilization and bares its inner malignancy for all to see.” In Part Two he pleads for “science and religion to unite, in order to develop a really scientific religion.”
In chapter XI, ‘The Voice of Talking Valley,’ Dr Alexander describes his journey into “a ragged, savage canyon” in “the mysterious Arizona Desert.” The native American name for this place means ‘Talking Valley’ and here he meets a hermit who “might have been a fair-skinned Indian … or a dark-skinned white man; his somewhat slanting eyes would have stamped him a Mongolian had they not been of a steely Nordic grey…” Asked for his name, the hermit would smile and say “I AM THE VOICE.”
The book also describes the author’s travels in search for truth. In chapter VIII, ‘The Trappa,’ he introduces the English-speaking abbot of a Tibetan lamasery, “old Tsiang,” who is also mentioned in the text on the back flap of the author’s next book, Creative Realism (aka The Power of the Mind), and who, according to Benjamin Creme, was the Master Djwhal Khul (see Share International No.10, December 2007, p.27). This is the same lamasery were H.P. Blavatsky and Murdo MacDonald-Bayne had studied.

A note on the title page specifies that this book is a private edition, “limited to one thousand autographed copies,” although it seems many copies went unautographed. The inscription in a copy listed on the ABEbooks website in 2008 makes it likely that Dr Alexander was living in Boulder City, Nevada when this book was published.

The back of the dust jacket features a rare photograph of Dr Alexander with his son Wayne.

1946

Rolf Alexander M.D.

The Power of the Mind

Originally published in the US as Creative Realism. A New Method of Winning (1954), this volume is better known by its UK title, The Power of the Mind — The System of Creative Realism (1956) — not to be confused with The Healing Power of the Mind by the same author.
Benjamin Creme states that this volume “is very interesting in that it provides a very simple process of self-hypnosis whereby you can free the mind from its fragmentation in the subconscious” (The Art of Living, p.158-59).
In his book Self-Suggestion and the New Huna Theory of Mesmerism and Hypnosis (HuNa Research Publications, CA, USA, 1958, p.38) Max F. Long writes: “Dr. Alexander offers the theory that we are all hypnotized to a considerable degree by what has happened to or around us in our lives. He seems to blame many of our personality troubles on this form of hypnosis-without-a-hypnotist, and he offers a method which he calls ‘self-realization’ to be used to dehypnotize ourselves. The use of this method is urged as a preliminary to the administering of autosuggestion. It is also to be used as an antidote to remaining in a suggestible trance to some extent after the use of autohypnosis.”

In the Preface to his first book Benjamin Creme writes that “The magazine article which drew my attention to [The Power of the Mind], of course, concentrated on the most sensational aspect of the book — ‘cloud busting’, the breaking up of clouds by the power of thought alone” (The Reappearance of the Christ and the Masters of Wisdom, p.12). Given Mr Creme’s early interest in flying saucers, his reference is probably to an article by Dr Alexander in the November/December 1955 edition of the British Flying Saucer Review, titled ‘Psychokinesis’ (pp.8-10). Earlier that year, in the US, FATE magazine carried an article about Dr Alexander (‘Rolf Alexander — The Man Who Smashes Clouds’) in its issue No.63 of June 1955 (pp.42-45), with photographs from the local Orillia Packet and Times newspaper.
This book contains the same photographs of the famous cloud-dispersal demonstration that Dr Alexander gave at the town of Orillia, Ontario, Canada on 12 September 1954, in the presence of representatives of the media and the mayor of Orillia. In the original US edition and the first UK edition these photographs are printed on the back of the dust jacket, while an additional set of 12 photographs is included in the book showing a cloud-dispersal demonstration which the author gave at Mexico City in January 1952, “before reliable and qualified witnesses”, as well as an Appendix and a Bibliography, which are not included in later UK impressions, the fourth and last of which appeared in 1968. In the closing paragraph of the Appendix the author writes: “This present book is written as a training manual in the basic principles of Creative Realism, but other books are planned to carry on from where this one halts.” (Another cloud-busting technique is described in Wilhelm Reich (1957), Contact With Space.)

Rolf Alexander M.D., a 1.8 degrees initiate (Share International No.1, Jan./Feb. 1995, p.31), was born on the American Clipper ship Luzon en route to New Zealand in 1891. He was taken by his parents to Canada as a boy, graduated in medicine in Prague and studied as a personal pupil of the Greek-Russian philosopher Gurdjieff in 1913. Around 1938 Dr Alexander travelled to India and on to Tibet where he stayed for one year as “the guest of an English-speaking abbot of a lamasery near Shigatze,” according to the biographical information on the back flap of the original US and UK editions. In Chapter 12, in the paragraph ‘The Lama’, the writer describes one of the hands-on lessons in detachment from the physical body from this lama, whom Benjamin Creme has confirmed was the Master Djwhal Khul (see the notes for The Voice of Talking Valley).
No further biographical information about the author could be found, except for a reference in The UFO Encyclopedia (2nd ed. 1998, p.277) by Jerome Clark, who writes: “In 1956, England’s Flying Saucer Review published startling revelations by a contributor identified only as a ‘special correspondent.’ The correspondent asserted that a highly placed American official had confided to him that UFOs were known to contain friendly space visitors who were trying to find a way to breathe Earth’s atmosphere before landing and declaring themselves. The magazine revealed nine years later that its unnamed informant was one ‘Rolf Alexander, M.D.,’ and that the official was the late general and diplomat George C. Marshall [of Marshall Plan fame, Ed.].”
Clark continues: “It did not mention that ‘Alexander’ was in fact an ex-convict whose real name was Allan Alexander Stirling. ‘Alexander’ claimed vast psychokinetic powers that allowed him to break up clouds.” According to Benjamin Creme, however, Rolf Alexander “was not Alexander Stirling, nor was he convicted of any crime.” (Share International No.10, December 2007, p.27)
Interestingly, UFO researcher Timothy Good also mentions Dr Alexander in his book
Alien Base.

1954

Rolf Alexander M.D.

The Mind in Healing

Dr Alexander’s last book is an elaboration of his approach to healing, as first set forth in Your Unknown Doctor (aka The Healing Power of the Mind).
Chapter 9 opens with the quotation, “He who would understand the world must try to understand himself for he creates the only world he will ever know”, attributed to one Tsiang Samdup (p.86). In chapter 8 of his book
The Voice of Talking Valley the author refers to the English-speaking abbot of the monastery where he studied for a year as “old Tsiang”, whom Benjamin Creme identified as the Master DK (see Share International No.10, December 2007, p.27). It is not known if Tsiang Samdup and “old Tsiang” are the same individual.

The first UK edition of this volume was available in orange cloth boards and in burgundy leather boards, although both editions had the same dust jacket.

The US edition was published by E.P. Dutton. A second US edition was printed in 1960

1958

Rolf Alexander M.D.

The Healing Power of Your Mind

Dr Alexander’s first book, Your Unknown Doctor (Canada, 1939), was first published in the US in 1943 in a slightly revised edition as The Doctor Alone Can’t Cure You. The text of this latter edition was copyrighted in 1976 by Inner Traditions International and published as The Renewing Power of Your Mind (Warner 1976; below). This volume is a reprint of that book.
References to the ‘Book of Right Feeling’ and the “old Scottish doctor” (from the 1939 edition) are not included, though the quotations from the former are. The author’s study in Tibet (as referenced in the major revision of 1949) is not mentioned here either.

This edition was re-published in 1997 as The Healing Power of the Mind. Practical Techniques for Health and Empowerment (Healing Arts Press).

1976

 

 

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